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2013 Early Independence Awardee demonstrates that neurological dysfunction seen in a mouse model of Kabuki syndrome is potentially reversible and linked to adult neurogenesis
 

Dr. Hans Tomas Bjornsson, MD, PhD, an assistant professor at the McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine and the department of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, has published a paper in the journal Science Translational Medicine, describing that a deficiency of dentate gyrus neurogenesis may underlie some of the neurological dysfunction seen in a mouse model of Kabuki syndrome, a rare Mendelian cause of intellectual disability. Using a drug known to target the epigenetic machinery, Bjornsson and his team demonstrated recovery of the neurogenesis defect in association with normalization of hippocampal memory defects in the treated mice. These findings suggest that Kabuki syndrome may be a treatable cause of intellectual disability even in postnatal life and raises the possibility whether deficiency of neurogenesis may underlie additional causes of intellectual disability.

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2012 Early Independence Awardee Receives Young Investigator Award For Schizophrenia Research

Dr. Alan Anticevic, Ph.D., was selected as one of the Young Investigator Awardees at the 14th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR). The ISCOR meeting is held biennially and is intended to encourage the gathering and exchange of data, techniques, and ideas from the schizophrenia research community. The Young Investigator Awards are given to bright young scientists producing high quality research related to the field of schizophrenia. Dr. Anticevic is a 2012 NIH Director’s Early Independence Awardee (EIA) whose EIA funded research is focused on understanding the underlying mechanisms of cognitive and affective disturbances in neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia, though an approach which combines neuroimaging, pharmacology, and computational modeling. The ultimate goal of his research is to be able to facilitate rationally-guided cognitive treatments for this devastating illness.

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Adam de la Zerda, Mitchell Guttman, Gregory Sonnenberg, Daniela Witten

Forbes Magazine names four NIH Stars among the 2012 “30 under 30" in Science and Innovation

The NIH Director's Early Independence Award is a relatively new funding mechanism that provides an opportunity for exceptional junior scientists to "skip the post-doc," and start an independent research career at a supportive Institution directly following the completion of their graduate degree or clinical residency. For the second year in a row, Forbes Magazine has selected several NIH Director’s Early Independence Awardees for the honor of "30 under 30" in Science and Healthcare for 2012.

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Forbes Magazine names 5 NIH Director's EIA Awardees
among Top Science and Innovation "30 under 30" for 2011John Calarco, Ph.D.James S. Fraser, Ph.D.Jeffrey M. Kidd, Ph.D.Harris H. Wang, Ph.DDaniela Witten, Ph.D

    The NIH Director's Early Independence Award is a new funding mechanism that provides an opportunity for exceptional junior scientists to "skip the post-doc," and start an independent research career at a supportive Institution directly following the completion of their graduate degree or clinical residency.

    Five of the top honored "30 under 30" in Science and Innovation by Forbes Magazine are NIH Early Independence Awardees for 2011.

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